Drs. Guettler and Bicos part of national study on Cartilage Restoration!

Drs. Guettler and Bicos are part of a national study looking at Cartilage Restoration.

The goal is to use patients’ own cells to repair cartilage defects in the knee.

Here is the article as taken from www.clickondetroit.com

The story can be found here.

Beaumont seeks participants for a research study of a cartilage tissue implant for knee injuries

Beaumont Health System is participating in a research study evaluating an investigational treatment called NeoCart®, a tissue implant made from a patient’s own cells, aimed at repairing certain knee cartilage injuries.

(Original article here)

A total of 245 patients will participate in the research of the surgical implant procedure in up to 40 sites across the United States. Approximately 20 patients at Beaumont will participate.

guettler_surgery
Beaumont orthopedic surgeon
Dr. Joe Guettler, principal
investigator of the study.

Orthopedic surgeons Joseph Guettler, M.D. and James Bicos, M.D. will be leading the study at Beaumont.

The research study will look at damage to the knee’s hyaline articular cartilage, the smooth, white tissue that covers the ends of bones where they come together to form joints. Damage to this cartilage may be caused by an injury or repetitive motion. It is a common problem that results in pain and symptoms, such as swelling, locking of the knee and loss of knee function. Damaged hyaline cartilage has limited capacity to repair or restore itself. Left untreated, the damage may progressively worsen and may lead to chronic conditions such as osteoarthritis.

To perform the procedure, the surgeon first obtains a sample of healthy cartilage from the patient’s knee. The small sample is treated and placed under special conditions in the laboratory that allow for cell growth. These cells are used to form a hyaline-like cartilage tissue implant that is in the shape of a small disc. The implant is then returned to the surgeon for surgical implantation into the patient’s injury site in the knee.

“The current standard of care for knee cartilage injuries is a cartilage-repair surgical technique called microfracture which works by creating tiny fractures in the underlying bone. This procedure is thought to create new cartilage-building cells from a so-called super-clot,” explains Dr. Guettler, principal investigator of the study.

“The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the tissue implant compared with microfracture. We will evaluate the pain and knee function in both treatment groups,” says Dr. Bicos, the study’s co-investigator.

“The possibility of implementing a preventive treatment aimed at undermining the inevitable consequences of degenerative arthritis could be a very significant advancement,” says Dr. Guettler.

Criteria
Patients 18 to 55 years old who have symptoms of knee pain in one knee may be candidates for this study. However, those who have previously failed other treatments or smoke more than one pack of cigarettes per week may not be eligible.

Patients accepted into the study will have a random chance of being treated with the implant versus microfracture. Neither the patient nor the physician may choose the treatment. Patients in each group will have a specific rehabilitation plan and will be evaluated periodically for three years after treatment.

The study sponsor is Histogenics Corp. For more information, visit www.clinicaltrials.gov keyword “NeoCart Phase III” or contact Beaumont Research Nurse Clinician, Lisa Stellon at 248-551-6679 or at lisa.stellon@beaumont.edu.

About Beaumont Orthpedic Services
Beaumont Health System provides a full range of specialized care in the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of all orthopedic injuries and conditions. Beaumont’s department of Orthopedic Surgery offers leading-edge treatments and technology including minimally invasive surgery, implants and trauma surgery. Beaumont is Michigan’s most experienced orthopedic hospital specializing in surgeries of the back, neck, foot, ankle, hand and upper extremities; hip and knee replacement; scoliosis treatment; tumor surgery; pediatric orthopedics; and sports medicine. Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak is Michigan’s top-ranked hospital for orthopedic care by U.S. News & World Report. Find out more at http://orthopedics.beaumont.edu/.

“Dunk Out” Injuries This Basketball Season

For more information, contact:
Dr. Joseph Guettler
Performance Orthopedics
248-988-8085

For Immediate Release
3/1/2014

‘Dunk-Out’ Injuries this Basketball Season
Dr. Guettler provide pointers to prevent basketball injuries

Photo: Kirby Lee/Image of Sport-US PRESSWIRE

Photo: Kirby Lee/Image of Sport-US PRESSWIRE

Royal Oak, MI—Whether participating in recreational outdoor games, playing on a school team or competing professionally, basketball is one of America’s most popular sport pastimes. With more than 28 million people of all ages taking part each year in this high-impact, extremely charged sport, the potential risk for injury is great. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) urges players to heed appropriate safety precautions and condition properly to minimize potential musculoskeletal injuries.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in 2011 more than 1.4 million people were treated in doctors’ offices, clinics and emergency rooms for basketball-related injuries. Among the most frequent are wrist or finger sprains and fractures, and twisting and impact injuries to the foot, ankle and knee.

“The majority of basketball injuries result from overuse, improper conditioning and trauma,” stated Dr. Joseph Guettler, Orthopedic Sports Medicine Surgeon with William Beaumont Hospital. “To avoid injury, it is important to stretch properly and participate in conditioning programs, such as cardiovascular training, core (abdominal area) strengthening and flexibility exercises.”

As part of the AAOS Prevent Injuries America! ® Campaign, orthopaedic surgeons would rather prevent injuries than treat them. Consider the Academy’s basketball safety tips:
Wear appropriate equipment. Shoes should fit snugly and offer support. Ankle braces can reduce the incidence of ankle sprains in patients with a history of injury (this should be discussed with your doctor); protective knee and elbow pads can protect players from bruises and abrasions. Consider wearing a mouth guard. Do not wear jewelry or chew gum while playing. Other helpful equipment may include eye protection, ankle braces or sports tape.

Ensure a safe play environment. Outdoor courts should be free of rocks, holes and other hazards. Players should avoid playing on outdoor courts that do not have appropriate lighting. Indoor courts should be clean, free of debris and have good traction. Baskets and boundary lines should not be too close to walls, bleachers, fountains or other structures. Basket goal posts, and the walls behind them, should be padded.

Maintain fitness throughout the year. Ideally, players should maintain an exercise and training regimen during the basketball season, and throughout the year.

Warm up before play. Consistent warm up and stretching exercises may reduce injuries. Warm up with jumping jacks, stationary cycling, or running or walking in place for three to five minutes. This should be followed by slow and gentle stretching, holding each stretch for 20-30 seconds. Stretches should focus on the legs, spine, and shoulders. A player should also stretch after their practices or games.

Safe Return to Play. An injured player’s symptoms must be completely gone before returning to play. The player must have no pain, no swelling, full range of motion, and normal strength and should be cleared by the appropriate medical provider.

Stay hydrated. Even mild levels of dehydration can hurt athletic performance. Ideally, players should drink 24-ounces of non-caffeinated fluid two hours before exercise, and additional 8-ounces of fluid or sports drink immediately before play. While playing, break for an 8-ounce cup of water every 20 minutes.

Use proper passing and play techniques. Practice good technique. For example, when you jump for the ball, land on a bent knee rather than a straight knee. Play only your position and know where other players are on the court to reduce the chance of collisions. Do not hold, block, push, charge, or trip opponents. Use proper techniques for passing and scoring, and most importantly, don’t forget sportsmanship!

Prevent overuse injuries. Because many young athletes focus on just one sport and train year-round, doctors are seeing an increase in overuse injuries. The AAOS has partnered with STOP Sports Injuries to help educate parents, coaches, and athletes on how to prevent sports injuries. STOP Sports Injuries recommends limiting the number of teams in which your child is playing on in one season. In addition, do not let your child play one sport year round; taking regular breaks and playing other sports is essential to skill development

Performance Orthopedics – Keeping you in the game, whatever your game may be!