How to get your child started in sports

This is a great article on how to get your child started in sports.

Remember that the main reason for starting children in sports is for the lifelong benefits from exercise.

Kids_and_sports

Listen to your child for clues of burnout from sports!

The article is from In Motion: Active Living for All Ages.

You can read the article here.

“Dunk Out” Injuries This Basketball Season

For more information, contact:
Dr. Joseph Guettler
Performance Orthopedics
248-988-8085

For Immediate Release
3/1/2014

‘Dunk-Out’ Injuries this Basketball Season
Dr. Guettler provide pointers to prevent basketball injuries

Photo: Kirby Lee/Image of Sport-US PRESSWIRE

Photo: Kirby Lee/Image of Sport-US PRESSWIRE

Royal Oak, MI—Whether participating in recreational outdoor games, playing on a school team or competing professionally, basketball is one of America’s most popular sport pastimes. With more than 28 million people of all ages taking part each year in this high-impact, extremely charged sport, the potential risk for injury is great. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) urges players to heed appropriate safety precautions and condition properly to minimize potential musculoskeletal injuries.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in 2011 more than 1.4 million people were treated in doctors’ offices, clinics and emergency rooms for basketball-related injuries. Among the most frequent are wrist or finger sprains and fractures, and twisting and impact injuries to the foot, ankle and knee.

“The majority of basketball injuries result from overuse, improper conditioning and trauma,” stated Dr. Joseph Guettler, Orthopedic Sports Medicine Surgeon with William Beaumont Hospital. “To avoid injury, it is important to stretch properly and participate in conditioning programs, such as cardiovascular training, core (abdominal area) strengthening and flexibility exercises.”

As part of the AAOS Prevent Injuries America! ® Campaign, orthopaedic surgeons would rather prevent injuries than treat them. Consider the Academy’s basketball safety tips:
Wear appropriate equipment. Shoes should fit snugly and offer support. Ankle braces can reduce the incidence of ankle sprains in patients with a history of injury (this should be discussed with your doctor); protective knee and elbow pads can protect players from bruises and abrasions. Consider wearing a mouth guard. Do not wear jewelry or chew gum while playing. Other helpful equipment may include eye protection, ankle braces or sports tape.

Ensure a safe play environment. Outdoor courts should be free of rocks, holes and other hazards. Players should avoid playing on outdoor courts that do not have appropriate lighting. Indoor courts should be clean, free of debris and have good traction. Baskets and boundary lines should not be too close to walls, bleachers, fountains or other structures. Basket goal posts, and the walls behind them, should be padded.

Maintain fitness throughout the year. Ideally, players should maintain an exercise and training regimen during the basketball season, and throughout the year.

Warm up before play. Consistent warm up and stretching exercises may reduce injuries. Warm up with jumping jacks, stationary cycling, or running or walking in place for three to five minutes. This should be followed by slow and gentle stretching, holding each stretch for 20-30 seconds. Stretches should focus on the legs, spine, and shoulders. A player should also stretch after their practices or games.

Safe Return to Play. An injured player’s symptoms must be completely gone before returning to play. The player must have no pain, no swelling, full range of motion, and normal strength and should be cleared by the appropriate medical provider.

Stay hydrated. Even mild levels of dehydration can hurt athletic performance. Ideally, players should drink 24-ounces of non-caffeinated fluid two hours before exercise, and additional 8-ounces of fluid or sports drink immediately before play. While playing, break for an 8-ounce cup of water every 20 minutes.

Use proper passing and play techniques. Practice good technique. For example, when you jump for the ball, land on a bent knee rather than a straight knee. Play only your position and know where other players are on the court to reduce the chance of collisions. Do not hold, block, push, charge, or trip opponents. Use proper techniques for passing and scoring, and most importantly, don’t forget sportsmanship!

Prevent overuse injuries. Because many young athletes focus on just one sport and train year-round, doctors are seeing an increase in overuse injuries. The AAOS has partnered with STOP Sports Injuries to help educate parents, coaches, and athletes on how to prevent sports injuries. STOP Sports Injuries recommends limiting the number of teams in which your child is playing on in one season. In addition, do not let your child play one sport year round; taking regular breaks and playing other sports is essential to skill development

Performance Orthopedics – Keeping you in the game, whatever your game may be!

Avoid Getting Sidelined This Winter

For Immediate Release
2/19/14

Avoid Getting Sidelined This Winter
Orthopaedic surgeon provides tips to prevent winter sports injuries

Bloomfield Hills, MI ⎯ At the sight of the first snowfall, kids and adults alike are eager to enjoy the variety of winter sports available. Hours of recreation are spent on activities ranging from sledding, snow skiing and tobogganing to ice hockey, ice skating and snow boarding. But according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, if the proper precautions are not taken to ensure warmth and safety, severe injuries can occur.

Winter sports injuries get a lot of attention at hospital emergency rooms, doctors’ offices and clinics. According to the U.S Consumer Product Safety Commission, more than 310,000 people were treated in hospitals, doctors’ offices and emergency rooms in 2012 for winter sports-related injuries. Specifically:
• more than 40,000 injuries were caused by sledding;
• 97,713 by snowboarding;
• 119,715, snow skiing; and,
• nearly 53,000 by ice skating.

“Countless numbers of winter sports injuries happen at the end of the day, when people overexert themselves to finish that one last run before the day’s end,” explained Dr. James Bicos, Orthopedic Sports Medicine Surgeon with William Beaumont Hospital. “A majority of these injuries can easily be prevented if participants prepare for their sport by keeping in good physical condition, staying alert and stopping when they are tired or in pain.”

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons urges children and adults to follow the tips below for preventing winter sports injuries:

Sledding
Numerous sledding injuries are caused by collisions at the end of sledding paths and/or sledding in improper positions. Click here to read a detailed list of safety tips to help reduce these injuries.

Snowboarding and Skiing
Many snowboarding and skiing injuries can be avoided by utilizing appropriate equipment, ensuring a safe environment and following all rules of these sports. Click here to read a full list of snowboarding and skiing safety tips.

General winter sports safety tips:
• Consider participating with a partner. If possible, skiers and snowboarders should stay with a partner and within sight of each other. Also, make sure someone who is not participating is aware of your plans and probable whereabouts before heading outdoors.
• Check the weather for snow and ice conditions prior to heading outdoors. Pay attention to warnings about upcoming storms and severe drops in temperature. Make adjustments for icy conditions, deep snow powder, wet snow, and adverse weather conditions.
• Dress for the occasion. Wear several layers of light, loose and water- and wind-resistant clothing for warmth and protection. Also wear appropriate protective gear, including goggles, helmets, gloves and padding and check that all equipment, such as ski and snowboard bindings, is kept in good working order.
• Warm up thoroughly before playing and exercising. Cold muscles, tendons and ligaments are vulnerable to injury. It’s important to warm up by taking it easy on the first few runs.
• Know and abide by all rules of the sport in which you are participating. Take a lesson (or several) from a qualified instructor, especially in sports like skiing and snowboarding.
• Always carry a cell phone in case of an emergency.

Click here to read more safety tips.

More tips:
Winter sports safety

For more information, contact:
Dr. James Bicos
Performance Orthopedics
248-988-8085